Modeling Amazon HQ2

When Amazon announced that it was considering Long Island City, NY as a location for its second headquarters, it drew notable media attention, much of it centered around speculation of the impact that the ‘HQ2’, as seen in the figure below, would have on its local community. The addition of a major business hub could affect, or even disrupt, the functioning of systems, from food sales to the various layers of the transportation network.

The Pink Tax on Mobility: Opportunities for Innovation

The Pink Tax is a form of gender-based price discrimination concerning the upcharge women pay for specific products or services. This white paper is based on the conviction that innovations to increase personal safety and improve accessibility for caregivers will provide greater access to education and jobs, deliver health benefits from more active transportation, and support women’s confidence and well-being in trip planning—while greatly reducing carbon emissions.

C2SMART-NYCDOT Connected Vehicle Research Breaks New Ground To Improve Mobility and Ensure Accessibility For Pedestrians with Vision Disabilities in NYC

As part of USDOT’s Connected Vehicle Project, C2SMART researchers at New York University – in collaboration with NYCDOT and industry partners JHK and Harman – recruited volunteer participants with vision disabilities via local and national organizations to help conduct field tests of a phone application, PED-SIG, which could improve mobility of pedestrians with vision disabilities to navigate safely and independently through New York City.

Smart Cities and Open Streets Enforcement

Cities around the globe are using the COVID-19 pandemic and resulting shelter-in-place orders to explore pedestrianizing streets. Strategies on which streets to open to communities and how to do so vary widely between municipalities. In some cities, busy streets considered too vital to close entirely are required to remove parking lanes to expand pedestrian space. A growing number of cities, including New York City, have developed plans to close parking lanes on several miles of street to provide more outdoor seating for adjacent restaurants and cafes. Many cities have also provided extra space in front of grocery and large chain stores to give lines of customers room to distance themselves. Cities such as Burlington and Providence have reduced speed limits in large portions of their downtown areas, and specifically in Burlington, the new lower speed limit was implemented citywide to try to mitigate pedestrian fatalities. Seattle has reserved many of its core streets for “local traffic only”, reducing congestion within certain neighborhoods, and improving street safety in high-density residential areas.