2022 ARISE Students Make Strides in Sustainability, Economic Recovery Research

This summer, the Behavioral Urban Informatics, Logistics, and Transport (BUILT) lab welcomed two local high school students from the NYU ARISE program, Sage Robinson and Alexander Sanchez. The Urban Mobility & Intelligent Transportation Systems (UrbanMITS) lab welcomed two more students, Sheyla Almanzar-Abreu and Steven Yan. ARISE, a 7-week fellowship, opens NYU’s Engineering, Life Sciences, and Computer and Data science labs to outstanding applicants. The program comprises a high level, 5-week authentic research experience in participating NYU faculty labs, mentoring in that placement by a graduate or postdoctoral student, a stipend for completing the program, and two weeks of workshops, college advisement and other activities geared to college application prep.

Smart Cities and Open Streets Enforcement

Cities around the globe are using the COVID-19 pandemic and resulting shelter-in-place orders to explore pedestrianizing streets. Strategies on which streets to open to communities and how to do so vary widely between municipalities. In some cities, busy streets considered too vital to close entirely are required to remove parking lanes to expand pedestrian space. A growing number of cities, including New York City, have developed plans to close parking lanes on several miles of street to provide more outdoor seating for adjacent restaurants and cafes. Many cities have also provided extra space in front of grocery and large chain stores to give lines of customers room to distance themselves. Cities such as Burlington and Providence have reduced speed limits in large portions of their downtown areas, and specifically in Burlington, the new lower speed limit was implemented citywide to try to mitigate pedestrian fatalities. Seattle has reserved many of its core streets for “local traffic only”, reducing congestion within certain neighborhoods, and improving street safety in high-density residential areas.